Do-It-Yourself Transfer of Large-Area Graphene Using an Office Laminator and Water (2022)

We demonstrate a simple method for transferring large areas (up to A4-size sheets) of CVD graphene from copper foils onto a target substrate using a commercially available polyvinyl alcohol polymer foil as a carrier substrate and commercial hot-roll office laminator. Through the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, large-area quantitative optical contrast mapping, and the fabrication and electrical characterization of ∼50 individual centimeter-scale van der Pauw field effect devices, we show a nondestructive technique to transfer large-area graphene with low residual doping that is scalable, economical, reproducible, and easy to use and that results in less doping and transfer-induced damage than etching or electrochemical delamination transfers. We show that the copper substrate can be used multiple times with minimal loss of material and no observable reduction in graphene quality. We have additionally demonstrated the transfer of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride from copper and iron foils. Finally, we note that this approach allows graphene to be supplied on stand-alone polymer supports by CVD graphene manufacturers to end users, with the only equipment and consumables required to transfer graphene onto target substrates being a commercial office laminator and water.

Original languageEnglish
JournalChemistry of Materials
Volume31
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)2328-2336
Number of pages9
ISSN0897-4756
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ACS AuthorChoice - This is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.

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Shivayogimath, A., Whelan, P. R., MacKenzie, D. M. A., Luo, B., Huang, D., Luo, D., Wang, M., Gammelgaard, L., Shi, H., Ruoff, R. S., Bøggild, P. (2019). Do-It-Yourself Transfer of Large-Area Graphene Using an Office Laminator and Water. Chemistry of Materials, 31(7), 2328-2336. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04196

(Video) Easy graphene transfer using desktop laminator and PVA plastic foil

Shivayogimath, Abhay ; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf ; MacKenzie, David M.A. ; Luo, Birong ; Huang, Deping ; Luo, Da ; Wang, Meihui ; Gammelgaard, Lene ; Shi, Haofei ; Ruoff, Rodney S. ; Bøggild, Peter ; Booth, Timothy J. / Do-It-Yourself Transfer of Large-Area Graphene Using an Office Laminator and Water. In: Chemistry of Materials. 2019 ; Vol. 31, No. 7. pp. 2328-2336.

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title = "Do-It-Yourself Transfer of Large-Area Graphene Using an Office Laminator and Water",

abstract = "We demonstrate a simple method for transferring large areas (up to A4-size sheets) of CVD graphene from copper foils onto a target substrate using a commercially available polyvinyl alcohol polymer foil as a carrier substrate and commercial hot-roll office laminator. Through the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, large-area quantitative optical contrast mapping, and the fabrication and electrical characterization of ∼50 individual centimeter-scale van der Pauw field effect devices, we show a nondestructive technique to transfer large-area graphene with low residual doping that is scalable, economical, reproducible, and easy to use and that results in less doping and transfer-induced damage than etching or electrochemical delamination transfers. We show that the copper substrate can be used multiple times with minimal loss of material and no observable reduction in graphene quality. We have additionally demonstrated the transfer of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride from copper and iron foils. Finally, we note that this approach allows graphene to be supplied on stand-alone polymer supports by CVD graphene manufacturers to end users, with the only equipment and consumables required to transfer graphene onto target substrates being a commercial office laminator and water.",

author = "Abhay Shivayogimath and Whelan, {Patrick Rebsdorf} and MacKenzie, {David M.A.} and Birong Luo and Deping Huang and Da Luo and Meihui Wang and Lene Gammelgaard and Haofei Shi and Ruoff, {Rodney S.} and Peter B{\o}ggild and Booth, {Timothy J.}",

note = "ACS AuthorChoice - This is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.",

year = "2019",

doi = "10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04196",

language = "English",

volume = "31",

pages = "2328--2336",

(Video) Graphene Thermal Conductivity Workshop - Avanzare

journal = "Chemistry of Materials",

issn = "0897-4756",

publisher = "American Chemical Society",

number = "7",

}

Shivayogimath, A, Whelan, PR, MacKenzie, DMA, Luo, B, Huang, D, Luo, D, Wang, M, Gammelgaard, L, Shi, H, Ruoff, RS, Bøggild, P 2019, 'Do-It-Yourself Transfer of Large-Area Graphene Using an Office Laminator and Water', Chemistry of Materials, vol. 31, no. 7, pp. 2328-2336. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04196

Do-It-Yourself Transfer of Large-Area Graphene Using an Office Laminator and Water. / Shivayogimath, Abhay; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf; MacKenzie, David M.A.; Luo, Birong; Huang, Deping; Luo, Da; Wang, Meihui; Gammelgaard, Lene; Shi, Haofei; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Timothy J.

In: Chemistry of Materials, Vol. 31, No. 7, 2019, p. 2328-2336.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

(Video) P1060732

T1 - Do-It-Yourself Transfer of Large-Area Graphene Using an Office Laminator and Water

AU - Shivayogimath, Abhay

AU - Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf

AU - MacKenzie, David M.A.

AU - Luo, Birong

AU - Huang, Deping

AU - Luo, Da

AU - Wang, Meihui

AU - Gammelgaard, Lene

AU - Shi, Haofei

AU - Ruoff, Rodney S.

AU - Bøggild, Peter

AU - Booth, Timothy J.

N1 - ACS AuthorChoice - This is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

(Video) CVD and Monolayer Graphene Production and Applications

N2 - We demonstrate a simple method for transferring large areas (up to A4-size sheets) of CVD graphene from copper foils onto a target substrate using a commercially available polyvinyl alcohol polymer foil as a carrier substrate and commercial hot-roll office laminator. Through the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, large-area quantitative optical contrast mapping, and the fabrication and electrical characterization of ∼50 individual centimeter-scale van der Pauw field effect devices, we show a nondestructive technique to transfer large-area graphene with low residual doping that is scalable, economical, reproducible, and easy to use and that results in less doping and transfer-induced damage than etching or electrochemical delamination transfers. We show that the copper substrate can be used multiple times with minimal loss of material and no observable reduction in graphene quality. We have additionally demonstrated the transfer of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride from copper and iron foils. Finally, we note that this approach allows graphene to be supplied on stand-alone polymer supports by CVD graphene manufacturers to end users, with the only equipment and consumables required to transfer graphene onto target substrates being a commercial office laminator and water.

AB - We demonstrate a simple method for transferring large areas (up to A4-size sheets) of CVD graphene from copper foils onto a target substrate using a commercially available polyvinyl alcohol polymer foil as a carrier substrate and commercial hot-roll office laminator. Through the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, large-area quantitative optical contrast mapping, and the fabrication and electrical characterization of ∼50 individual centimeter-scale van der Pauw field effect devices, we show a nondestructive technique to transfer large-area graphene with low residual doping that is scalable, economical, reproducible, and easy to use and that results in less doping and transfer-induced damage than etching or electrochemical delamination transfers. We show that the copper substrate can be used multiple times with minimal loss of material and no observable reduction in graphene quality. We have additionally demonstrated the transfer of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride from copper and iron foils. Finally, we note that this approach allows graphene to be supplied on stand-alone polymer supports by CVD graphene manufacturers to end users, with the only equipment and consumables required to transfer graphene onto target substrates being a commercial office laminator and water.

U2 - 10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04196

DO - 10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04196

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85063572184

VL - 31

SP - 2328

EP - 2336

JO - Chemistry of Materials

JF - Chemistry of Materials

SN - 0897-4756

IS - 7

ER -

Shivayogimath A, Whelan PR, MacKenzie DMA, Luo B, Huang D, Luo D et al. Do-It-Yourself Transfer of Large-Area Graphene Using an Office Laminator and Water. Chemistry of Materials. 2019;31(7):2328-2336. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04196

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Recently, much attention has turned to the structural and electronic properties of carbon-based materials. At present, especially, graphene is the hottest topics in condensed-matter physics and materials science. This is because graphene has not only unusual properties regarding extreme mechanical

In the present work, graphene ?lms of the order of 1cm2 were grown on copper foil substrates by CVD using hydrogen/methane or hydrogen/argon/ethanol mixturesasgasprecursors.The growth processes were performed near 1,000?C both at atmospheric and low pressures.. SEM image of Cu substrate after graphene growth. The films are predominantly single layer graphene with a small percentage (less than 5%) of the area having few layers, and are continuous across copper surface steps and grain boundaries.. CVD temperature of 1000?C and CVD time of 30min are the optimum temperature and time for growing high-quality graphene ?lms on the Cu tape, respectively.. we have studied the growth mechanism of graphene layers on Ni(111) surface.. Typical snapshots of LEEM images obtained as the temperature was decreased from 1200 K to 1125 K (images (a) to (d)).. Typical LEEM images of the graphene growth at different stages: (a)-(b) the first layer growth observed at 1125K, (d)-(f) the second layer at 1050K and (g)-(h) the third layer at 1050K.

Introduction to growth and transfer of large-area graphene

To make use of the CVD graphene, different transfer methods have been developed to release the. monolayer graphene from the growth substrate and transfer it onto desired substrate.. But due to the. mechanical force applied on the graphene during attaching and removing the PDMS stamp, the. transferred graphene may be mechanically damaged.. Due to the strong Van der Waals force. between the graphene and the Cu foil, mechanically peeling the graphene off the Cu will be very. difficult and can generate large damages to graphene.. The H2 bubbles force separation of graphene from the Cu and hence allows for. transfer of graphene, which is called electrochemical delamination (ECD) transfer or “bubble”. Given that. reduction of copper oxide can take place at a lower potential than that for hydrogen evolution, it. is possible to separate the graphene from Cu by selective removing the natural oxide layer. sandwiched in between of graphene and Cu.. 2.3 Characterization of transferred graphene 2.3.1 Optical microscopy of graphene. While during synthesis of graphene the experimental conditions have been selected to grow. monolayer graphene, sometimes bilayer or even few layer graphene may appear at the center of. the crystal.. The monolayer graphene, when examined using Raman spectroscopy, should show two or three. bands, including a G band around 1587 cm -1 attributable to the in-plane vibrational of the sp2. hybridized carbon atoms, a 2D band around 2680 cm -1 due to a two-phonon lattice vibration, and. sometimes a D band around 1350 cm -1 known as disorder band and represents defects of. graphene or presence of a ring in the proximity of graphene.. In this chapter we introduced the procedure of preparation of graphene using CVD method on Cu. foil as well as transfer of the graphene to desired substrates.. delamination procedure to minimize generation of bubbles between Cu and graphene during. transfer, and reduce contact of graphene with ions other than OH -1 and H + groups.

MATERIALS SCIENCE

Although significant progress has been made in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and epitaxial growth of graphene, the carrier mobility obtained with these techniques is still significantly lower than what is achieved using exfoliated graphene.. We show that the quality of CVD-grown graphene depends critically on the used transfer process, and we report on an advanced transfer technique that allows both reusing the copper substrate of the CVD growth and making devices with mobilities as high as 350,000 cm2 V-1 s-1, thus rivaling exfoliated graphene.. However, to serve as channel material in electronic devices such as high-frequency transistors (17), Hall sensors (18), and various other applications (19), CVD-grown graphene needs to be transferred from the growth substrate (typically copper) onto an insulating substrate, for example, SiO2 or hexagonal boron nitride (hBN).. In state-of-the-art transfer methods (20), a transfer polymer is deposited directly onto the graphene, and the copper substrate is chemically etched away.. This approach has two major drawbacks: first, chemical residues strongly degrade the electronic properties of graphene and reduce its mobility well below the values obtained in exfoliated graphene; second, it leaves no copper to be reused in a new growth step and thereby significantly increases the production costs and creates chemical waste.. Here, we report on a delamination method that overcomes these problems and results in CVD-grown graphene devices with properties comparable to those ofhigh-quality exfoliated graphene.. Graphene flakes are grown by low-pressure CVD (1, 10, 26), using methane as a precursor and copper as a growth substrate (see Materials and Methods).. Thanks to the strong van der Waals interactions between the graphene and the hBN, the graphene is picked up from its growth substrate when separating the stack again.. In summary, we demonstrated that it is possible to use the van der Waals interaction between hBN and graphene to pick up CVD-grown graphene flakes from their growth substrate and to deposit them on an arbitrary substrate.. This proves that CVD-grown graphene is not inferior to ultrahigh-mobility exfoliated graphene, if transferred appropriately.. Disorder-induced charge carrier density fluctuation n* and charge carrier mobility m (averaged over both carrier types) for 10 Hall bar devices fabricated from graphene encapsulated in hBN, using the dry transfer technique (rectangles).. Indeed, the critical feature of our transfer method compared with previous delamination techniques (21-23) is that throughout the fabrication process graphene gets into contact only with hBN, which is an ideal dielectric for high-performance graphene devices (35).. N. Petrone, C. R. Dean, I. Meric, A. M. van der Zande, P. Y. Huang, L. Wang, D. Muller, K. L. Shepard, J. Hone, Chemical vapor deposition-derived graphene with electrical performance of exfoliated graphene.

En cumplimiento de lo establecido en el artículo 10 de la Ley 34/2002, de 11 de julio, de Servicios de la Sociedad de la Información y de Comercio Electrónico (en adelante, LSSI-CE), se informa de modo expreso, preciso e inequívoco, tanto a los usuarios, destinatarios del servicio, como a los órganos competentes, de los siguientes aspectos relativos al prestador de servicios de la sociedad de la información:

En cumplimiento de lo establecido en el artículo 10 de la Ley 34/2002, de 11 de julio, de Servicios de la Sociedad de la Información y de Comercio Electrónico (en adelante, LSSI-CE), se informa de modo expreso, preciso e inequívoco, tanto a los usuarios, destinatarios del servicio, como a los órganos competentes, de los siguientes aspectos relativos al prestador de servicios de la sociedad de la información:. Según la Ley 34/2002, de 11 de julio, de Servicios de la Sociedad de la Información y Comercio Electrónico, (LSSICE) le informamos que nuestro sitio web utiliza Cookies propias y de terceros.. Cookies de Análisis/Medición Permiten al responsable de estas, realizar análisis del comportamiento de los usuarios del sitio web y se utilizan para la medición de la actividad del sitio web y para elaborar perfiles de navegación de los usuarios, con la finalidad de ofrecer mejoras de uso para los usuarios.. Tipos de cookies exceptuadas de consentimiento Cookies de "entrada del usuario" Cookies de autenticación o identificación de usuario (únicamente de sesión).. No obstante, debe saber que puede oponerse a ser objeto de una decisión automatizada de sus datos, donde se evalúen aspectos personales, como puede ser analizar o predecir aspectos relacionados con su rendimiento en el trabajo, situación económica, salud, las preferencias o intereses personales, fiabilidad o el comportamiento, de manera que a consecuencia de ello se produzcan efectos jurídicos sobre su persona o le afecte de una manera similar.. Plazo de conservación El plazo de conservación de los datos será el menor posible, de acuerdo con la finalidad para la cual se recabaron los datos, atendiendo al principio de minimización de los datos.

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